txchnologist:

Next-Generation Satellite Dissects Storms From Top To Bottom

Meteorologists are getting a whole new view of the weather systems that bring rain, snow and ice thanks to an instrument launched into orbit earlier this year. The next-generation Global Precipitation Measurement satellite and a constellation of other observatories and relays scan the entire globe every three hours to send back an avalanche of data.

Read more and see the video below.

Continue reading…

(via sagansense)

science-isinteresting:

Some beautiful blues from my inorganic chem lab the other day. I really love these labs because of the amazing colours. In this experiment I made chiral copper(II) complexes of the amino acids glycine (lighter blue) and L-alanine (darker blue). This is just part one of the experiment, part two next week.

(via chroniclesofachemist)

spacemutants asked:

So Hank, what's the deal with Pluto right now? Is it a planet or not?

The Grand Staircase Answer:

edwardspoonhands:

Pluto is not a planet. The IAU (in my book) gets to decide what the definition of a planet is because there has to be a definition and they are by far the most qualified body to define it. 

Pluto does not meet that definition, and thus should not be considered a planet. I agree with their definition, but even if I didn’t I would submit to it because I am not an expert. 

Recently, three people sat in a room and argued about whether pluto was a planet. The audience then voted…and they voted that Pluto was a planet. That, of course, means nothing. If you want random groups of people to define scientific terms…it’s going to be hard to get any actual science done. 

madtrader:

As I was clicking the shutter, my wife whispered in my ear: I want to grow old like that couple.

madtrader:

As I was clicking the shutter, my wife whispered in my ear: I want to grow old like that couple.

springwise:

This ring lets blind people read non-Braille books
One of the problems with Braille is that it’s typically printed in specialist books aside from the copies created for sighted people, meaning that those with sight difficulties can’t borrow their friends’ books and need to seek out the bookstores and libraries that cater for them. In the past, we’ve seen projects such as Thailand’sMr. Light and Mr. Dark — which uses special typography to enable the blind and non-blind to read the same book. Now the FingerReader initiative from MIT provides visually impaired readers with a wearable ring that can scan written text and read it out loud. READ MORE…

springwise:

This ring lets blind people read non-Braille books

One of the problems with Braille is that it’s typically printed in specialist books aside from the copies created for sighted people, meaning that those with sight difficulties can’t borrow their friends’ books and need to seek out the bookstores and libraries that cater for them. In the past, we’ve seen projects such as Thailand’sMr. Light and Mr. Dark — which uses special typography to enable the blind and non-blind to read the same book. Now the FingerReader initiative from MIT provides visually impaired readers with a wearable ring that can scan written text and read it out loud. READ MORE…

(via we-are-star-stuff)

wildcat2030:

Rare molecule found in space hints at life’s origins -Cornell University Original Study - The discovery of an unusual carbon-based molecule near the galactic center of the Milky Way suggests that the complex molecules needed for life may have their origins in interstellar space. Organic molecules usually found in these star-forming regions consist of a single “backbone” of carbon atoms arranged in a straight chain. The carbon structure of this molecule—known as isopropyl cyanide—is branched, making it the first interstellar detection of such a molecule, says Rob Garrod, a senior research associate at the Center for Radiophysics and Space Research at Cornell University. This detection opens a new frontier in the complexity of molecules that can be formed in interstellar space and that might ultimately find their way to the surfaces of planets, says Garrod. The branched carbon structure of isopropyl cyanide is a common feature in molecules that are needed for life—such as amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins. The discovery, reported in the journal Science, lends weight to the idea that biologically crucial molecules, like amino acids that are commonly found in meteorites, are produced early in the process of star formation—even before planets such as Earth are formed. (via Rare molecule found in space hints at life’s origins - Futurity)

wildcat2030:

Rare molecule found in space hints at life’s origins
-
Cornell University Original Study
-
The discovery of an unusual carbon-based molecule near the galactic center of the Milky Way suggests that the complex molecules needed for life may have their origins in interstellar space. Organic molecules usually found in these star-forming regions consist of a single “backbone” of carbon atoms arranged in a straight chain. The carbon structure of this molecule—known as isopropyl cyanide—is branched, making it the first interstellar detection of such a molecule, says Rob Garrod, a senior research associate at the Center for Radiophysics and Space Research at Cornell University. This detection opens a new frontier in the complexity of molecules that can be formed in interstellar space and that might ultimately find their way to the surfaces of planets, says Garrod. The branched carbon structure of isopropyl cyanide is a common feature in molecules that are needed for life—such as amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins. The discovery, reported in the journal Science, lends weight to the idea that biologically crucial molecules, like amino acids that are commonly found in meteorites, are produced early in the process of star formation—even before planets such as Earth are formed. (via Rare molecule found in space hints at life’s origins - Futurity)

futurist-foresight:

Zoobotics produces a modular robotics kit worth watching.

futurescope:

Zoobotics is developing modular animal-like robots made from paper, wood or plastics that can be assembled with a few tools

A startup from Hamburg (Germany) is experimenting with tetra- and hexapods, made from cardboard and paper. All technical functions are controlled by an Arduino Uno. Estimated base price incl all parts and reusable components atm around 300 €. They’re aiming for a crowdfunding release at the end of 2014. Count me in.

Description of Zuri 01:

ZURI is a programmable robot made from paper and grey cardboard. This motion machine, conceived of as a kit, can be assembled with a few tools (cutter, ruler, cutting mat, bone folder, glue and screwdriver). In addition to a distance sensor, the Paper Robot has servo motors, servo controllers and a Bluetooth module for wireless control via PC or smartphone.

ZURI is a modular robotic system. It is based on two leg variants (2DOF / 3DOF) and two different body modules (1M / 2M). The combination of leg and body modules allows for a lot of robot variations. This results in different degrees of difficulty regarding programming and coordination of the running gaits.

The ZURI-PAPERBOT-SYSTEM combines disciplines such as modeling, the use of electronics and programming. It is perfect for use in the classroom.

[Zoobotics] [long feature in german on golem] [all pictures by zoobotics]