the grand staircase

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20 year old biochem major, future doctor, enthusiast of all sciences.
Fueled by coffee, and a love of learning.

asapscience:

So… what could this mean for quantum mechanics? 
via George Takei

asapscience:

So… what could this mean for quantum mechanics? 

via George Takei

— 7 hours ago with 307 notes
libutron:

Blue buttons have antimicrobial properties
The so called Blue button looks like a jellyfish but it isn’t, well isn’t even a single organism, but a colony of hydroids scientifically named Porpita porpita (Anthoathecata - Porpitidae). 
Results of a study to check the antimicrobial properties of these sea organisms, published in 2010 in the Middle-East Journal of Scientific Research, indicate that extract of the central disc region of Porpita porpita exhibits activity against both bacterial (gram-positive and gram-negative) and fungal strains. The maximum antibacterial inhibition was recorded in Klebsiella pneumonia and the maximum antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger.
These yet preliminary analyses show that the Blue button, beside being beautiful, contains antimicrobial peptides, which might prove to be of high use in the pharmaceutical industry as a component of antibiotics. 
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Bjørn Christian Tørrissen | Locality: Mozambique

libutron:

Blue buttons have antimicrobial properties

The so called Blue button looks like a jellyfish but it isn’t, well isn’t even a single organism, but a colony of hydroids scientifically named Porpita porpita (Anthoathecata - Porpitidae)

Results of a study to check the antimicrobial properties of these sea organisms, published in 2010 in the Middle-East Journal of Scientific Research, indicate that extract of the central disc region of Porpita porpita exhibits activity against both bacterial (gram-positive and gram-negative) and fungal strains. The maximum antibacterial inhibition was recorded in Klebsiella pneumonia and the maximum antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger.

These yet preliminary analyses show that the Blue button, beside being beautiful, contains antimicrobial peptides, which might prove to be of high use in the pharmaceutical industry as a component of antibiotics. 

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Bjørn Christian Tørrissen | Locality: Mozambique

— 7 hours ago with 172 notes
glxciers:

Ice Fairie’s Window: Brent McCombs

glxciers:

Ice Fairie’s Window: Brent McCombs

(via ponderation)

— 7 hours ago with 576 notes
northwezt:

Sunrise | Washington ➤ Alesha Brown (northwezt)

northwezt:

Sunrise | Washington ➤ Alesha Brown (northwezt)

(via northwezt)

— 7 hours ago with 2040 notes

discoverynews:

When the ‘Supermoon’ Wowed the World

More photos

— 19 hours ago with 1847 notes

griseus:

The spotted handfish (Brachionichthys hirsutus), an amazing creature that walks the ocean floor, is a rare Australian fish from the family Brachionichthyidae. It is classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List 2002. is the first Australian marine species to be threatened with extinction.

The greatest threats to the handfish appear to be siltation and invasive species. The Derwent Estuary where the fish lives is highly urbanised and industrialised, and a range of marine pests have been introduced through shipping.  One key pest is the Northern Pacific Seastar (Asterias amurensis), a particularly large and voracious predator that is now abundant in the estuary. Studies by CSIRO show that the seastars eat the stalked ascidians that the handfish use to attach their eggs.

(via trynottodrown)

— 19 hours ago with 1189 notes
radiologysigns:

70yo woman with numbness in her hands. What’s your diagnosis? 

ANSWER: http://goo.gl/TzH3Au

radiologysigns:

70yo woman with numbness in her hands. What’s your diagnosis?

ANSWER: http://goo.gl/TzH3Au

(via fuckyeahnarcotics)

— 19 hours ago with 69 notes
danielx9 asked: What would happen if some one were to have a syringe full of ATP (the energy molecule for cells) injected into their system?


Answer:

smilesandvials:

mindblowingscience:

I don’t have much biology background but my guess is that it wouldn’t do much. I believe ATP needs to be present within cells to provide work and transfer energy across the cellular processes.

Any biology savvy people with a better answer?

Apparently this is a very common question on the internet so I have taken the liberty of using the all mighty search engine to compile an answer.

  • Energy molecule. Means bonds be breakin’ like cray to release energy. Important. Means it isn’t very stable. Doesn’t transport well and the production of it is closely linked to its consumption. (x,x)
  • Extracellular enzymes are going to take it down. (x)
  • HOWEVER, ATP is also sometimes a signaling molecule so you might mess up some communication. (x)
  • PEOPLE WROTE A PAPER ABOUT IT: Effect of continuous ATP injection on human hemodynamics (X). It apparently does cause some complications but those dissappear after continuous injections are ceased (see both signal disturbance and eaten-up-really-fast).

*Am not biologist, do not study biology.

— 19 hours ago with 39 notes
smilesandvials:

arthuralbionkirkland:

ultrafacts:

For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts  (Source)

The day has come
that my coffee cup has become more accurate than the weather man.
Sorry dude you’re kinda out of a job now.

Drinks do this shit.
The Integrated Science Center is under negative pressure (both between the outside of the building and all the labs compared to the highway). If you go in there with an open carbonated drink, it will instantly go flat. The building is built this way because a) it keeps all fumes in and near the ventilation system/hoods and b) in case of explosion, the pressure difference will keep fire from like, you know, flowing out the doors like it’s a goddamn action film, keeping accidents contained.However, the difference is noticeable to humans and it can be *very* disorienting. (Also sometimes the system gets messed up and you have to REALLY FREAKING TRY to open the doors and it makes pseudo-airlock noises and it is absurd).

smilesandvials:

arthuralbionkirkland:

ultrafacts:

For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts  (Source)

The day has come

that my coffee cup has become more accurate than the weather man.

Sorry dude you’re kinda out of a job now.

Drinks do this shit.

The Integrated Science Center is under negative pressure (both between the outside of the building and all the labs compared to the highway). If you go in there with an open carbonated drink, it will instantly go flat. 

The building is built this way because a) it keeps all fumes in and near the ventilation system/hoods and b) in case of explosion, the pressure difference will keep fire from like, you know, flowing out the doors like it’s a goddamn action film, keeping accidents contained.

However, the difference is noticeable to humans and it can be *very* disorienting. (Also sometimes the system gets messed up and you have to REALLY FREAKING TRY to open the doors and it makes pseudo-airlock noises and it is absurd).

(Source: ultrafacts, via thecraftychemist)

— 19 hours ago with 12648 notes
xysciences:

Simple explanation of what radians are. 

xysciences:

Simple explanation of what radians are. 

(via scienthusiasts)

— 19 hours ago with 13221 notes

fuckyeahmineralogy:

  1. Red Beryl [x]
  2. Aquamarine [x]
  3. Pyrite on Rhodochrosite [x]
  4. Fluorite [x]
  5. Malachite Stalactite [x]
  6. Cobaltoan Calcite [x]
  7. Rhodochrosite [x]
  8. Dioptase [x]
  9. Fluorite [x]
  10. Spessartine [x]
— 19 hours ago with 14432 notes